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Probiotics and Gut Microbiome Trigger Emotion and Mood Brain Signatures

Posted by Geoff Beaty on 29 September 2021
Probiotics and Gut Microbiome Trigger Emotion and Mood Brain Signatures

The gut microbiota-brain axis plays an important role in gastrointestinal function and regulating mood, anxiety, and pain, by communicating with the brain. Most studies have used animal models, however the following is a human double-blind study.

This study provides multidimensional evidence that administration of a multi-strain probiotic (the probiotic studied is available in the United States as Omni-Biotic Stress Release) and the associated change in gut microbiota composition has a significant interrelated impact on behavioral scores and functional MRI measures in distinct brain areas involved in emotional decision-making and emotional memory processes.

Researchers investigated the influence of a multi-strain oral probiotic supplement on brain function through read outs and self-reports on mood and behaviour from healthy volunteers.

The study subjects included:

Probiotic – PRP group (on the probiotic for 4 weeks),
Placebo – PLP group (which took placebo for 4 weeks) and,
No intervention – NI group (no intervention) with 15 participants each.

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that measured brain activation in response to decision-making and memory-based tasks, respectively measured participants.

The researchers compared gut microbiome composition before and after probiotic intake and measured the implications of gut microbiota in the mechanisms triggered by probiotics.

Study Results

Probiotic administration influenced the behavioural scores for depression and anxiety questionnaires by significantly increasing positive affect and blunting vulnerability to depression in terms of hopelessness and risk aversion.

Probiotics improved memory performance and altered brain activation patterns.

In the emotional recognition memory task, there was a statistically significant difference for response accuracy for unpleasant stimuli.

For the emotional decision-making task, researchers observed that probiotic intervention was associated significant differences in the brain activation pattern between the three groups (DPRP, DPLP, NI) in response to the neutral>baseline contrast and unpleasant>baseline contrast.

Self-reported behavioural measures correlated with Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent signal change in the probiotic group.

Probiotics administration was associated with subtle, but significant changes in gut microbial community composition.

Microbial community composition mirrored behavioural performance in questionnaires and fMRI recognition memory task.

In conclusion, this study provides evidence that administration of a multi-strain probiotic and the associated change in gut microbiota composition has a significant interrelated impact on behavioural scores and functional MRI measures in distinct brain areas involved in emotional decision-making and emotional memory processes.

The influence of probiotics on human brain metabolism remains an important question for future investigations. 

Reference:

Bagga D, Reichert JL, Koschutnig K, et al. Probiotics drive gut microbiome triggering emotional brain signatures. Gut Microbes. 2018;9(6):486-496. doi:10.1080/19490976.2018.1460015

 

Author:Geoff Beaty
Tags:NewsCancerProbioticsImmune system

Associations

  • The Institute for Functional Medicine
  • Society for Integrative Oncology
  • American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • Australasian Integrative Medicine Association
  • Naturopaths and Herbalists Association of Australia