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Phytonutrients

Posted by Manuela Boyle on 8 April 2021
Phytonutrients
Phytonutrients are plant-based chemicals available through a diet that includes whole grains, beans, fruits, vegetables, spices, and herbs. Research suggests that these bioactive compounds, which contribute to a plant's colour, taste, and smell, also have beneficial health effects. For example, flavonoids are compounds found in cocoa, apples, and green tea. Epidemiological studies have suggested a positive association between diets high in flavonoid-rich foods and cardiovascular health, while clinical trials have shown lower blood pressure results after consumption of flavonoid-rich food. In addition, phytochemicals such as sulforaphane and lycopene have health-promoting properties and protective effects against many diseases, including cancers1 Even with the suggested benefits, according to a Centres for Disease Control and Prevention report, only one in ten adults meet the recommendations for fruit and vegetable daily intake, potentially increasing their risk for developing chronic diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes and heart disease.

References:
Rees A, Dodd GF, Spencer JPE. The effects of flavonoids on cardiovascular health: a review of human intervention trials and implications for cerebrovascular function. Nutrients. 2018;10(12):1852. doi:10.3390/nu10121852
Klomparens EA, Ding Y. The neuroprotective mechanisms and effects of sulforaphane. Brain Circ. 2019;5(2):74-83. doi:10.4103/bc.bc_7_19
Grabowska M, Wawrzyniak D, Rolle K, et al. Let food be your medicine: nutraceutical properties of lycopene. Food Funct. 2019;10(6):3090-3102. doi:10.1039/c9fo00580c
Only 1 in 10 adults get enough fruits or vegetables. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Published November 16, 2017. Accessed February 9, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html

Author: Manuela Boyle
Tags: News Media Evidence Based Research Weight Optimisation Most Popular foods & cancer treatment

Associations

  • The Institute for Functional Medicine
  • Society for Integrative Oncology
  • American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • Australasian Integrative Medicine Association
  • Naturopaths and Herbalists Association of Australia
  • British Naturopathic Association

Disclaimer: Manuela Boyle is not a registered medical practitioner or specialist medical oncologist. Manuela Boyle is a general health service provider who is not legally required to be registered under National Health Practitioner regulation law. She practises under the national Code of Conduct that sets standards to general health service providers who are not regulated by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency.

Manuela Boyle is an accredited member of the following professional organisations:
NHAA (Naturopaths & Herbalists Association of Australia), SIO (Society of Integrative Oncology) USA, AIMA (Australasian Integrative Medical Association), IFM (Institute of Functional Medicine) USA